Transplanting Roses & Protecting Coleus From The Cold

Question:

Is this a good time to transplant several mature Hybrid Tea roses from one area of my garden to another?  Should it be done before or after they been pruned or does it matter?  Also, can I plant new roses in the same spot?

Answer:

  • Most gardening books recommend transplanting roses while there are dormant; however, with our mild temperatures, roses never go completely dormant, it is also not unusual for them to have buds and blooms, although the foliage looks crummy.
  • The ideal window to relocate or transplant roses along with other landscape shrubs and conifers is from Thanksgiving through mid-March. Typically, most gardeners wait until after the holidays to transplant.
  • You prune before or after as it doesn't matter. I’d prefer to prune them back first, so there are fewer branches and thorns to get in the way by reducing the height and sides. Roses have an extensive spreading root system, so you're going to leave some behind you may bare root the plants. The lack of soil now is not a problem because of the cool conditions.
  • You can also spread this task over several days or weekends.
  • Once out of the ground, you can store them above the ground by covering them with a tarp or plant them in temporary containers.
    • Roses survive beautifully after being treated roughly. When you’re ready to replant, avoid a common mistake and plant them too deep. The top of the first root should be at or near the soil surface.
    • All too often the bushes are planted up to the bud union. The bud union is the area were the desirable rose variety is budded to the rootstock and should be above ground.
    • The distance between the roots and the bud union varies greatly with each bush. Problems develop from the poor drainage from our clay soils and the constant moisture from frequent waterings
  •   I’m not aware of any issues that would prevent you from planting a new rose in the old location(s).
  • The new roses for 2018 along with many of your old favorites will arrive at your favorite garden center later this month.

Question:

This summer, I planted three large Coleus plants in pots in partial shade. Should I take them inside for the winter, or will they survive outside?

Answer:

  •  Coleus is one of those plants that adapt to indoor and outdoor conditions. They will survive the winter outside as long as the temperatures stay above forty degrees.
  • However, they grow nicely indoors in a room with lots of direct or indirect light. To be on the safe side, I’d move them indoors now and then back outdoors in early March after the danger of frost has passed.
  • At that time, I’d prune off fifty percent of the growth and fertilize with Osmocote or other similar time-release fertilizer to encourage the lateral growth.

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