When To Transplant Roses & Winter Seasonal Color

Question:

 I’m revamping, my rose garden and need to know when is the earliest time  I can successfully move established roses to another location?

Answer:

  • The transplanting season for a wide variety of plants begins in the middle of November or when the daytime temperatures are under 70 degrees and concludes in early April.
    • You could transplant roses, ornamental shrubs, conifers arenow but I’d wait until March for citrus. It is also at this time that you would root prune established container plants and replant them in the same pot.
    • With roses, I’d prune them first to make a move easier.
      • You could reduce the height and bring insides and then finish the pruning next year. If the new site isn’t ready, you can transplant the roses successfully into plastic or paper mache pots.
      • The roses can thrive for six to eight months in pots.  Also if  mother nature disrupts your plans, temporary containers  are an excellent Plan ‘B.’

Question:

 What can I plant as annual color around my mailbox and Crape Myrtle tree? I’ve had Fibrous Begonias, but they can't tolerate frost.

Answer:

  • Your best bet is to plant Pansies, or Violas for a mass of color as they’ll bloom into the spring.
  • But you’ll need to adjust your expectation when planting at this time of the year.
    • The growing season is over and the days are getting shorter and colder. The color needs to be planted closer together to minimize the bare spots.
    • It will be eight to ten weeks before you’d see any growth out of these plants. Instead of spacing plants twelve inches apart, the spacing should be four to six inches. The color area needs to look as full as possible from the beginning.
    • I would also apply a tablespoon of Starter Fertilizer or under each plant. The fertilizer helps prevent the plants from turning a yellowish color in January from the lack of nutrients.

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