Boric Acid For Ant Control

Question:

 I'd like to use a Boric Acid bait to control the ant problem in my kitchen. The directions on the Boric Acid say to broadcast it as is.  However, a person I spoke to said to mix it with granulated sugar and then place the mixture in a jar lid on the counter. Which method is the most effective?

Answer:

  •  With the dry conditions, ants are coming indoors much earlier than usual in search of water.
  • Boric Acid is a pretty good answer for controlling ants, although it sounds dangerous. EPA considers Boric Acid to have a low toxicity risk with humans and other mammals. It's not known to cause cancer, birth defects, or allergies. Boric Acid works best against the tiny and usually black or reddish/black colored sugar ants.
  • It's an odorless, white powder that can be combined with mint jelly, honey, peanut butter, and corn syrup, along with sugar. It's an odorless, white powder that can be mixed with mint jelly, honey, peanut butter, and corn syrup, along with sugar. You'll be looking for a two percent mixture of Boric Acid to the attractant.
    • Sugar and water is a better attractant than a dry mixture. One cup of sugar and four teaspoons of Boric Acid in three cups of water should give you the necessary two percent solution. The mixture is heated to just before the boiling point and then let cool. Hot water is needed to make the Boric Acid soluble. The pot is then sanitized in a dishwasher. For solids food baits, mix one teaspoon of Boric Acid with one solid cup to make a two percent solution.
  •  There are many types of receptacles available for the ant bait stations. You can use shallow jar lids,  a baby food jar with holes punched in the top, bottle caps, two-inch lengths of drinking straws, or trays of tin foil. With the sugar water solution, you can pour it directly into the lids or trays or over cotton balls placed at the bait station's bottom.
    • Don't worry; the ants will find their way into the container. If you see a line of ants in your kitchen, place the bait directly in the line. Don't skimp on the number of bait stations you set out. If you don't know where they're coming from, place the bait stations along windowsills or in the countertop corners.
    • The bait is changed every few days. Even though they have low toxicity, common sense dictates you keep them out of the reach of pets and children. Also, clearly label and store any leftover bait in the garage.
  •  And finally, don't expect the ants to disappear overnight. Boric Acid is a slow-acting stomach poison that each ant takes back to the colony and shares with only a few other ants. In a few days, you'll notice a reduction in the number of ants near the bait, but it could take three to four weeks to eradicate the colony, causing your problems ultimately.   

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