Transplanting A Root Bound Camellia & Dwarfing Fruit Trees

Question:

I have a Camellia in a terracotta pot who's roots has grown through the drainage holes and rooted into the ground. I’m not entirely sure what to do next to fix things. 

Answer:

his is not as much of a problem as it might seem. Your Camellia is root bound.
  • I suspect its been in the same container for a very long time or planted in too small of a container. Either way, now and for the next month, is an excellent time to remedy the situation.
  • The solution is quite simple, push the container over as far as you can and cut the roots off at the drainage hole.
    • Now, you have two options, root prune the Camellia and replant it in the same container or transplant it into a larger pot. Containerized maples, roses, azaleas, gardenias and many others are transplanted once every thirty-six to forty-eight months as a standard practice. This prevents them from becoming root bound and declining.
    • Root pruning allows you to keep a plant in the same container indefinitely by creating room for new roots while transplanting enables you to increase the container size gradually over time.
  •  With either technique, you’ll be cutting the root ball, and this makes people very, very nervous, as they are concern about permanently damaging the plant. Unless you grossly overdue it, this shouldn’t be the case.
    • You’d remove the Camellia from the container exposing the rootball. It was maybe necessary to break the pot.
    • As plants become root bound, they develop a thick and tightly bound rootball in the shape of the container.
      • You’ll need to break this pattern by severing the roots with a serrated knife, you’re pruning shears, or a pruning saw.
      • You physically slice, trim or cut away two to six inches from the sides of the root ball and four to eight inches off the bottom.
      • If it’s being transplanted, make four to twelve slices or slashes depending on the size of the root ball and don’t forget the bottom.
      • Next, you add fresh potting soil to the new or existing container, insert the Camellia, fill the vacant space with soil to complete the transplanting project and water.

Question:

How do you dwarf a fruit tree?

Answer:

For the home gardener, pruning is the best method of dwarfing fruit trees. It is more challenging to dwarf an established fruit-bearing tree as the severe pruning will interfere with the yield for several years, but it can be done. A commercial fruit grower will use a dwarf rootstock to keep trees small. Budding a desired variety on the appropriate rootstock does this. There are many different rootstocks that a grower can use. Besides the height, some rootstocks are nematode resistant while others will tolerate heavy soils. A grower can bud the same variety on several different rootstocks depending on where the trees are going to be grown.  The following website provides more information on the different types of rootstocks. http://www.davewilson.com/roots_table.html