Berries In Containers & Pruning A Potato Vine

Question:

 What type of berries will grow in containers? I have a small backyard with limited space to grow anything. 

Answer:

  • You're not as limited as you might think, as all the popular berries can be grown in containers.
  • Blueberries by far are the easiest to grow. A couple of plants will yield a decent number of berries with a minimal amount of effort. They like a bright sunny location that is protected from the mid and late afternoon summer sun. A twenty to twenty-four-inch pot should be large enough.
    • To avoid a pollination problem, select a low chill, self-pollinating variety such as Sunshine Blue or Bountiful Blue. Low chill varieties produce berries in our mild winters.
  •  Strawberries are next on the list. Strawberry Jars are popular, but I don't feel they produce enough to be considered. Strawberries are best grown in a rectangular planter that is afoot wide by foot deep and of any length.
    • The Everbearing types are the best for containers as they produce few runners and have multiple crops of berries per year. The container(s) should run north to south, so each side of the plants gets an equal amount of sun. While they can endure the sun's heat, they are also will survive in partial shade.
    • Because of the heavy production, the plants wear themselves out and should be replanted with new ones every three years.
  •  Raspberry Shortcake and Baby Cake Blackberries complete the list of container berries. They're dwarf and thornless great for decks, patios, and balconies that receive hot afternoon sun. They have an endearing compact growth habit that thrives in a container.
    • Don't be fooled by its pint-sized appearance; it produces full-size, super-sweet raspberries and blackberries.
    • Unlike the other cane berries, they require no trellising or staking.
  •  Raspberry Shortcake and Baby Cakes produce fruit mid-summer on the second-year canes. You're more likely to find them at your favorite independent garden center. Generally speaking, berries will need to be watered frequently, and I would fertilize with Osmocote twice during the growing season. Osmocote is a time-release fertilizer that provides a little bit on nutrients every time you water.

Question:

 I have a white Potato vine growing on an arbor in a container. Recently, I noticed the arbor was tilting backward. Roots growing out the drainage holes caused the tilling. If I cut these roots to balance the arbor correctly, will the vine die? 

Answer:

  •  I wouldn't expect your Potato vine to die from trimming the roots expanding from the drainage hole of a container. Some dieback may occur, but you minimize that by pruning the top growth at the same time.
  • There is a direct relationship between the roots under the ground and the foliage it supports. Also, another option would be to reduce the original rootball by root pruning. It's then replanted in the same container or a new one. Early spring is an excellent time to fix this issue.