Moving A Bougainvillea & Controlling Crabgrass

Question:

I need to move an established Bougainvillea so we can enlarge our family room.  Can it be transplanted it at this time of the year? I really would like it to survive. 

Answer:

  • Bougainvilleas are successfully transplanted from containers.
  • Unfortunately, this is not always the case with established plants. They have a very fine root system that doesn’t knit tightly to form a solid rootball. When they’re moved, the root ball breaks apart, reducing the survival rate.
  • This is not an ideal time to move with the warm days and nights.
  • You’d be better off if you waited until October, but that may not be an option.  So, here is how I’d go about moving it now.  I’d look to do this during the early morning or evening avoiding the heat of the day.
    • The first thing to do is prune the canopy back severely. This reduces the demand on the roots. 
    • I’d first dig around the plant to form the root ball and support it by lining it with cardboard secured with ties. I’d use several bungee cord ties available at any home improvement store and secure it tightly.
    • Next carefully, tip the root ball over cutting the roots as you go. The rootball is then picked up or slid it carefully to a new location and upright in the new hole.
    • As the backfill is added, you remove the ties but not the cardboard. It will decompose naturally. You would cut off any cardboard that extends above the soil. Proper planting techniques are employed by amending the backfill with soil amendments and be sure not to bury the root ball to seep. 
    • Finally, take a few digital pictures of it for the refrigerator before you start. In this way, you avoid the last memory of your favorite plant, collapsing, turning brown, and then dying. 

Question:

My backyard lawn has patches of Crabgrass. Which ‘Weed and Feed’ should I be using to control it?  I haven’t been successful with the ones I’ve tried.   

Answer:

  • Bayer Advanced ‘All In One Weed and Feed’ is a granular product that fertilizes the lawn, kills broadleaf weeds along with Crabgrass and other undesirable grasses.
  • This is the first year it has been available. ‘All In One Weed and Feed’ uses the same active ingredient that you would find the liquid Crabgrass control.
  • The liquid Crabgrass killer comes in a ‘Ready To Spray ’ container that you attached to your hose. There are several brands available. So far, I’ve found these products to be disappointing in controlling the actively growing Crabgrass. They’re very slow-acting, taking weeks for the results to show up. 
  • Crabgrass goes dormant in the winter and reappears around the 4th Of July.  It thrives until November when it goes to seed and dies out. 
    • The best most effective method of controlling Crabgrass is to kill the dormant seeds. Pre-emergent Crabgrass turf products are applied in January and February. That being said, I’m going to try ‘All In One Weed and Feed’ to see if it’s more effective than the liquid.