Transplanting A Rose & Black Sooty Mold On Plum

Question:

I have a six-foot tall Iceberg rose that needs to move to accommodate a new deck. The problem is that I'm unsure where I'd like it to end up. Can I plant it in a temporary container, or does it need to go into the ground?

Answer:

  • Sure, you can move your Iceberg rose to a temporary location at this time of the year. But I would do so when the temperatures are over ninety degrees.
  • The rose can be put in a temporary container, planted directly into the ground, and then transplanted again. Roses are very resilient. It would help if you pruned it back thirty to forty percent to compensate for the root loss.
  • Personally, I'd put it in a temporary container. The Paper pulp pot works very well for this task. They are inexpensive and biodegradable. When you have decided on its new home, you'll be able to plant it, pot and all. Before planting, cut a few holes in the pot's side, and remove the pot rim and any portion of the pot that sticks above the soil. This aids in the decomposition of the pot. It takes about six months for the pot to disintegrate.
    • Paper pulp pots are available at most garden centers or online (see the link in Notes).

NOTE: Western Pulp Large Containers : https://www.greenhousemegastore.com/containers-trays/plant-pots/western-pulp-large-containers

Question:

The leaves on my flowering plum tree are covered with black soot. This has never happened before, so I'm puzzled by it. What's the problem, and how can I prevent it from reoccurring?

Answer:

  • The Black Sooty Mold is a fungus that grows on the honeydew produced from sucking insects. The honeydew is a clear and sometimes sticky substance created while the insects feed on plants. It coats the foliage and everything else below where the insects are feeding.
    • Aphids, Mealybug, and Mites all produce honeydew, but I think Scale is your problem. There are many different types of Scale insects, but I believe you have Kuno Scale. Kuno Scale attacks flowering and fruiting plums as well as Pyracanthas, Crabapples, and Citrus.
    • The adult Kuno Scale is a large, dark maroon or burgundy round pea or pearl-like structure that attaches itself to the stems and branches.
    • They easily blend with dark-colored bark and go undetected. In the spring, you will notice white streaks on the stems and branches. These are the juvenile Scale that matures into adults during the summer.
  • ┬áThis year the Black Sooty Mold will disappear from the leaves when the tree goes dormant and the leaves drop off. You prevent it from reappearing next year by killing the Kuno Scale.
  • Right now, I would spray the tree with Horticultural Oil and follow up during December and January with a Dormant Spray. The dead Scale will not fall off the tree.
    • You can tell if they are dead or alive by puncturing several of them. The dad Scale should crumble. Also, any fruit covered by the Black Sooty Mold is edible. Just wash it off.