Wax Leaf Privet with Burnt Leaves & Persimom Fruit Drop

Question:

 Last spring, I purchased four huge, twenty-four-inch pots and planted them with Wax Leaf Privet. I needed to camouflage an unsightly neighbor's yard. I was told that the privets could take the hot sun and grow rapidly to eight to ten feet. Unfortunately, none of these things have proven to be true. The plants have barely grown in the past seven months, and the leaves are burned from the sun. Is there any way to remedy this problem, or can you recommend other more suitable plants? 

Answer:

  • Wax Leaf Privet is an excellent choice, but it's unrealistic to think that they would grow to eight feet in the first growing season. Two to three seasons are more likely
  • The poor performance issue is from water stress. Although you watered regularly, it may not have penetrated the original root ball. A primary indicator of this is yellow and burnt leaves. In addition, if you fertilized while they were on the dry side, you may also have had a fertilizer burn.
  • The norm for watering container plants would be three times per week and more often when the temperatures are over eighty degrees; otherwise, the plants suffer. This also means you must fill the container to the brim with each watering. It is almost impossible to overwater containerized plants as long as there is no saucer and the bottom of the pots are raised off the ground so the water can flow out the bottom.
  • With large containers, you have a lot of excess soil. To help channel the water through the roots, you may need to have a watering basin within the container. This would be necessary until the new growth is generated the roots are contained in the original rootball.
  • The rootball should be wet at the planting time; otherwise, the water will roll around the rootball and never penetrate. This may have been an issue you had. As the plants mature, you have less and less soil and a predominance of roots; so the watering schedule is maintained. Privets are hardy, so these plants are not a lost cause.
  • With the growing season nearly concluded. In February or March, I'd feed them Osmocote. Osmocote releases nutrients with every watering, and the fertilizing should be reapplied every four months. If you decide the plants need to be replaced, I'd suggest you consider Eleagnus Maculata or Marginata, or Viburnum Tinus Robustum. 

Question:

 I have two Fuju Persimoms trees that are dropping their immature fruits. Is there some type of deficiency that makes them do this? They seem well irrigated and fertilized.

Answer:

  • An improper watering and fertilizing schedule causes Persimmons to drop their fruits  Persimmons are drought-tolerant, so they're watered deep but not frequently. Usually, once every three to four weeks after the rainy season is completed. A single application of fertilizer is sufficient. A fall feeding is preferred over a spring application.