Planting Tree Roses & Blooming Tulips -What’s Next?

Question:

 I'm looking to plant three tree roses to line a walkway and wondering how far apart should they be planted? Also, do they require any special care?         

Answer:

  • Tree Roses are typically spaced four feet apart.
  • That would be four feet from the center of one variety to another and two feet off the walkway. However, they can be placed further apart to make them visibly pleasing or closer.
    • Also, keep in mind, the type of rose you're planting. Grandiflora and Hybrid Tea varieties are large bushes and should be planted farther apart than a Floribunda.
    • This should prevent the growth from co-mingling. If they do, you can control the side growth by pruning them in the winter and during the growing season. Tree roses are treated no differently than a bush rose except there growth starts not at the ground but four feet off the ground at the graft.
    • So, I five-foot high bush rose could get to be very tall as tree roses. You prevent this by pruning it after every flush of flowers.
  •  Also, they need to be staked to support the main stem. The stake that comes with tree rose is not adequate enough. The top of the stake should be right under the bud union and go six to eight inches in the round. Tree roses are susceptible to blowing over and breaking during the windy summer months.

Question:

 When I was in the Netherlands last autumn, I bought a few packages of tulip bulbs and planted them in pots. When the bulbs finish blooming, what do I do with them? Can I leave the spent bulbs in pots through the summer and then put them back in the refrigerator around autumn sometime? If that is the case, do I fertilize the spent bulbs?                                                                     

Answer:

  • After flowering, you leave the bulbs in the pot and fertilize with Bulb Food.
  • You continue to water them until the foliage turns brown. The pots are stored in a dry location until the fall. You could also take the bulbs out of the pots and store them in a paper bag.
  • It's not necessary to cool them again. I'd bring them out in late October water then, and make one application of Bulb Food. Mother Nature should do the rest.

NOTE: Flowering Tulips, Daffodils, and other bulbs are usually growing in sand and not soil. We these plants, I'd discard them after blooming. Sand is very sterile so, there is little chance the bulbs will store a sufficient amount of food after flowering to do much next year.