Blooming Lemon With No Fruit & Unknown Fruit Tree

Question:

 I have a four-year-old lemon is growing on my patio. It blooms frequently, but they never turn into lemons, and the leaves often turn yellow with brown edges. I’m watering it once a week, and the drainage seems good. Could it be in too shady a location?

Answer:

  • Citrus, typically require six hours or more of sunlight per day. With oranges, and tangerines, warm, sunny days are the critical element in sweetening up the fruit that ripens later, so more is better while lemons and limes are naturally tart and mature with less sunlight. Thus, along the coast lemons and not oranges are the better choice to grow while inland it doesn’t matter.
  • Also, the failure to set fruit is not an exposure issue. Instead, your problem is water stress. Your weekly watering schedule is inadequate for an established lemon in a container. This is also true with oranges, grapefruits, kumquats, limes, and others; it’s not just a lemon thing.
  • Citrus consists mostly of water, so when moisture is limited, they’ll drop the immature pea or marble-sized fruit to conserve water. In severe cases, the leaves discolor with brown sections.
  • Another contributing factor is the length of time the plants have been in its container. The soil will be displaced over time by the new roots formed to support the top growth. It also disappears as it flows out the drainage holes and is consumed by the soil microbes. This isn’t a problem in the ground as there is plenty of room for the roots to expand.
  • Also, not every flower produces a lemon as an unnoticeable number do not form naturally. Lemon flowers and sets fruit year-round so there should be no shortage of lemons at any given time.
  • The yellow leaves can be associated with watering issues, but more than likely, it’s a nutrient issue that is not related to the watering frequency. Lemons like other container plants like to be fed regularly as nutrients are consistently leaving the soil and the root zone every time you water.
  • In conclusion, both of these problems are simply corrected by watering more often and establishing a consistent feeding pattern. When the temperatures are over seventy-five degrees, I’d water it three times a week and more often with warm temperatures.  Besides heat, windy conditions will dry plants out.  Citrus is fed Citrus Food monthly April through October or every four months with Osmocote. 

Question:

I have a few trees are now producing fruit, which has never borne fruit before.The fruit looks like a cross between plum and cherry.  Leaves are a deep purple hue. What is it called and it edible

Answer:

  • This doesn’t sound like any commercial type tree but more than likely the fruit of flowering plums. Flowering Plums are thought of as being fruitless, but not all the varieties are. There are three primary varieties of Prunus being planted. If the flowers were white, then it’s Thundercloud. If they’re single pink, it’s Vesuvius. Blireana is fruitless with double pink flowers.  They’re used in jams and jellies.