Intruding Bamboo & No Flowers On My Rose

Question:

My neighbor planted Bamboo in his yard right next to our fence. We chopped out some of the roots, but the sidewalk is bulking and raising up.  I understand a metal barrier can be placed in the ground to prevent this from happening again, but wonder how deep should it be. Is there a type of root killer we can use? Is it legal for people to grow Bamboo, and is the neighbor liable for the damage to my sidewalk?

Answer:

  • Bamboo runners are a massive problem with no clear-cut answers.
  • When planting a tree, shrub, or vine on or near a fence, little or no consideration is given to whether or not it will intrude into another yard. Desirable or not, plants do not respect property lines.
  • It's not illegal to grow Bamboo in California. Bamboo spreads aggressively from above and below ground rhizomes. The longer you do nothing, the more severe the problem becomes.
    • A metal barrier, the deeper, the better, is a solution. The minimum depth would be eighteen inches and should be stainless steel, so it doesn't rust. Unfortunately, this is only a band-aid, as the Bamboo will return in the future as they have deep roots.
    • Another band-aid is cutting the root(s) out and resetting the sidewalk. There is an excellent chance this problem will reoccur sooner versus later.
    • Treating the area with a non-selective herbicide, such as Ortho Ground Clear or similar product, to kill the roots may be an option, as long as there no desirable plants nearby. Before applying any herbicide, get a clear understanding of the pros and cons. Again, spot treating is a band-aid because you don't know where all the underground roots are located.
    • Treating the bare ground, especially next to the fence, is marginally successful.
  •  Your neighbor has to be proactive in solving this problem as you can't solve it by yourself. This is a separate problem in itself, especially if it's a renter. To assess the liability issues for the damage, I'd get a copy of the book, Neighbor Law from Nolo press to help sort out those answers: (Neighbor Law - Legal Books- Fences, Trees, Boundaries & Noise)

Question:

I pruned my rose bushes in February/March, fertilized, and watered them as suggested and had few blooms. Since the initial flowers, there has been nothing, The bushes look very lush and green, but no buds form. What did I do wrong, and is there anything I can do now to correct it?

Answer:

  •  Roses bloom at the end of the vegetative shoots or canes. With each flush of new growth, you get a new set of flowers. The lack of flowers is usually associated with plants that are neglected. However, that does not seem to be the case here, with them being lush and green.
  • So, I'd start to feed them with Rose Food. The extra nutrients should trigger a flush of growth and flowers. I'd expect them to be in bloom around Halloween.