Snail Eggs Control & Reblooming A Wisteria

Question:

With all the recent rains, my poor garden was left to fend for itself. The snails moved in, in droves, and laid piles of eggs. I would have thought I would have fewer with the drought and dry conditions, but that is not the case. Is there a spray that could kill the eggs before they hatch but wouldn't harm the flowers? 

Answer:

  •  I'm not aware of any chemical spray that controls the snail eggs or, for that matter, slugs. You're only option is to bait the area with a liquid or granular product once the snails have hatched. Baiting should be an ongoing task during the growing season.
  • However, I'm a bit puzzled by your problem. It is unusual for the egg masses of snails to be laid in big piles. Snails like a moist environment as they like they avoid the sun, so they are only active at night and hide during the day when it is cool, dark, and damp.
    • Snail eggs are white, spherical, and laid in a one-inch-in diameter mass. Each grouping contains about eighty eggs. Observing immature or baby snails and baiting these areas more frequently can reduce the future adult population.
    • Near the end of the rainy season, this is important in controlling the population. When the rainy season concludes, snail activity is restricted to those areas under irrigation, so you should only bait those areas.
    • In addition, an adult snail doesn't need to mate as it has both male and female reproductive organs. Unfortunately, snails are a problem that will never go away.
  •  In arid conditions, a snail can retract itself into its protective shell and seal over the entry with a mucus layer. This is the same mucus it uses to move from one location to another. The mucus hardens and can remain dormant for up to four years.
    • Sluggo is the preferred Snail and Slug Bait as it's an organic solution around edibles and is pet and kids-safe.
  • One last thing, Osmocote fertilizer often gets confused with snail eggs, be sure you're not confusing the two.

Question:

I have a Wisteria that's fifteen years old. It grows by leaps and bounds yearly but blooms only in the spring. My neighbor's Wisteria blooms and reblooms for months every year. What must I do to get mine to blossom and bloom again?

Answer:

  • The simple answer is that there is not a thing you can do to extend the blooming season. With Wisterias, Mother Nature controls the entire repeat blooming cycle.
  • It's more likely to happen when the temperatures go from mild to hot and back to mild. This type of change is the trigger for a flowering cycle. This is more likely to occur where there is a strong marine influence and unlikely in the warmer inland areas.
  • On a personal note, my blue Wisteria is in bloom for Easter, while the pink one flowers around Mother's Day. Also, the blue Wisteria always has a repeat blooming cycle throughout the summer, while the pink one reblooms periodically.