Chili Pepper Failure & Transplanting A Seedling Walnut

Question:

My chili peppers are thriving in a half oak barrel, but the blossoms are shriveling up and dropping off. They get watered every other day or every day depending on how hot it gets. They’re fertilized monthly and get five hours of sunlight daily. What is causing the blossom drop?

Answer:

  • Blossoms drop on pepper plants, particularly Chili Peppers is becoming more and more of an issue. The number one reason peppers fail to flower and or the blossom shrivel up and drop off is temperature. Much like tomatoes, and sweet peppers, they like warm days and warm nights to produce.
  • Peppers fail to set fruit when the nighttime temperature is below fifty-five degrees or on very warm nights. The later rarely occurs. In addition, overly cool conditions, especially early in the season, can prevent buds from forming: hence, May is the ideal month to plant peppers.
  • With temperature issues, location, location, location is critical for both in the ground plantings or those in containers. Five hours of direct sunlight is a borderline situation for success. Six hours or more is generally required and preferably in the afternoon when the sun is the hottest.
  • Chili Peppers are problematic to grow along the coast or any area that gets an afternoon marine influence. The further inland you move increases the success ratio. It’s not unusual to have mild periods during the summer months, as our temperatures do vary weekly.
  • Other reasons why peppers fail to set fruit are going could be they’re going dry between watering and excessive nitrogen that promotes lots of vegetation at the expense of the blossoms and fruit. Monthly feeding for containers is okay but maybe too mulch for those in the ground.
  • Peppers are self-pollinating but poor air circulation can lead to pollination problems especially if they’re right next to a solid wall. Moving them easily solves this. In addition, pepper blossoms are even more sensitive to the temperature during pollination.
  • So, I think the answer to your problem is to move the barrel to a sunnier location. 

Question:

I’d like to know if I can dig up and relocate a small two-year-old, ground squirrel planted, walnut tree. Will it produce nuts?

Answer:

  • Seedling walnuts can be successfully transplanted when they’re dormant between December and February however, producing edible nuts is a whole another issue. The walnut/seed is the result of two unknown parents that have cross-pollinated.
  • The odds of a seedling walnut producing an edible crop are very unpredictable. Your chances are higher with a Black Walnut verse an English Walnut. English Walnut varieties are the desired variety for consumption and budded on to a Black Walnut rootstock.
  • You’ll have to wait an unknown period of years to see what develops. This is why commercial fruit and nut trees and citrus are grafted, or budded for predictable offspring.
  • Another negative is that a mature walnut is much too large for today’s typical garden. So, while they can be transplanted, it’s very likely you’ll be disappointed with two very large, unproductive trees.