Why Do I Need To Feed My Plants?

Question:

I’m new to gardening and  I’m wondering why one must fertilize container plants frequently. If you buy good plants, have good soil and take care of them, why then is fertilizer necessary? Also, why does 0-10-10 help plants bloom? Won't they bloom on their own?         

Answer:

  • Plants require nutrients to grow and thrive without them they struggle and eventually die.
  • One of the functions of roots is to absorb nutrients. The nutrients are then transported upward throughout the plant. Nutrient depreciation or loss in containers is rapid because every time you water, which is frequently, water carries them away as the container drains.
  • It’s important to recognize that container plants have perfect drainage versus those planted in our clay or adobe soil that drains poorly. Also, the roots are restricted to a pre-defined area, the pot size while those plants in the ground have plenty of room to expand beyond their canopy. Soil microorganisms are also present absorbing organic matter and converting them into nutrients.
  • Over time the volume of soil disappears in containers and is replaced with roots while this is not the case with those planted in the ground.
    • The three primary elements necessary for plant growth are Nitrogen (N), Phosphorus (P) and Potassium (K), also known as NPK. There are ten or more secondary elements like Boron, Iron, Sulphur, Copper, Magnesium, and others needed in lesser amounts.
    • Nitrogen is necessary for growth and lush green foliage. It leaches quickly from soils because it is a mobile element, so it needs to be replaced frequently.
    • Phosphorus and Potassium are for fruit and flower production, aids in the general plant hardness, and remains longer in our soils. The nutrient/fertilizer analysis is on every bag of fertilizer and is expressed as a percentage. The first number is always Nitrogen (N), next is the Phosphorus (P) and finally Potassium (K). On the back of every fertilizer bag, you'll find a detailed listing of all the elements including the secondary ones.
  •  Some plants fail to bloom when they are growing too vigorously while others are not affected by the growth cycle. Light and temperature are two other strong influences in flowering. Low or no nitrogen type fertilizers like 0-10-10 help plants bloom and are applied during the winter months to Bearded Iris, Citrus and others.
  • Gardeners will switch to 0-10-10 with Fuchsias, Tuberous Begonias, and other flowering plants once the desired size has been reached to maximize color.
  • Today, we’re spoiled as we have many different types of fertilizers to choose from, such as time release, organic, water-soluble and synthetic. They’re all right answers but which one is the best? I prefer the time release fertilizers. I then only have to feed a couple of time a year to keep plants thriving. For you and your yard, the Nursery Professional at your favorite garden center is the resource for plant-specific fertilizers and fertilizing.

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